Queen's Honours: Lynton Bradford

Switched on: Anglican Retirement Villages Residents Computer Club president and newsletter writer, Lynton Bradford (OAM). Picture: Natalie Roberts

Switched on: Anglican Retirement Villages Residents Computer Club president and newsletter writer, Lynton Bradford (OAM). Picture: Natalie Roberts

Most people can’t turn to their 82-year-old pop for computer advice.

But they don’t have Lynton Bradford in their family.

He’s president of his retirement villages residents’ computer club at Castle Hill and of Computer Pals for Seniors Club in Epping, where he is also a computer skills tutor and equipment officer.

‘‘I’ve always been interested in electronics and electrical things,’’ said Mr Bradford who, ironically, was the national services’ manager for an organisation called EMAIL (actually short for Electricity Meter and Allied Industries Limited) when he retired.

EMAIL was a manufacturer of commercial/industrial stainless steel products such as Westinghouse, Kelvinator and Simpson.

‘‘The young guys were all talking a language I didn’t understand and I had to learn it,’’ Mr Bradford said with reference to computers.

Since moving to Anglican Retirement Villages (ARV), where he was a volunteer bus driver until recently, he has coordinated a roll-out of internet kiosks, introduced battery and computer equipment recycling schemes and presented at Australian Seniors Computer Clubs Association conferences.

Unsurprisingly, he received a Medal of the Order of Australia for service to seniors’ computing.

‘‘I guess we should all do what we’re skilled at to help others,’’ Mr Bradford said.

‘‘I think what we’re striving for here [at ARV] is to get people mobile electronically and make them more independent.’’

When he isn’t building computers or cruising the web, he’s cruising our waters with the Australian Hartley TS 16 Association which has racing fleets in Queensland, NSW, Victoria and South Australia. He’s their president.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop