Perspective: Roads won't fix problem

RECENTLY, Infrastructure NSW released a document outlining a strategy for transport in Sydney.

It essentially focused on roads: adding and expanding to the road system we already have. Its focus was cars, and the end result of the plan would be getting more cars on the road, rather than getting them off our already congested road system.

The other problem with the plan is that the independent body's report, which was presented to the state government for approval, did not consider the movement of people within the western and north-western suburbs. It concentrated on moving people from the suburbs of Sydney to the city CBD.

But figures show that there is a growing percentage of people who live and work in the west — they don't need to travel to the city every day.

So it's the population in the west and north-west that suffers the most — on a daily basis — because of this city's inadequate public transport. The roads are getting more and more congested, but there is no incentive to take our cars off the road and rely on public transport.

I travel every work day from near Parramatta to our office in the Norwest business park — a 20-kilometre journey.

If I take the car, the trip can take anywhere between 30 to 45 minutes, depending on traffic, and I spend $50 a week on petrol.

By public transport, it will take me about an hour, and cost $16 a day. In total, it will cost me more by public transport than by car.

It is really counter-intuitive that public transport costs more than car travel.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop