The Border of sanity: living beyond stereotypes

EMPATHY: Chris Bogusis, who has PTSD believes there's awareness of mental illness, but not enough understanding. Picture: MARK JESSER

EMPATHY: Chris Bogusis, who has PTSD believes there's awareness of mental illness, but not enough understanding. Picture: MARK JESSER

Decades ago, there was little awareness of mental illness in Australia.

Despite many years and campaigns, stigma and a lack of understanding remains.

Dale Skinner, 34, said people were still surprised when he tells them he has bipolar type two. 

A full-time public servant, married father and football club president, Mr Skinner isn’t what most people picture when they think of someone with a complex metal illness. 

Click the image for our special feature.

Click the image for our special feature.

But Mr Skinner is representative of the one in five Australians who will experience a mental illness each year. 

They are neighbours, colleagues and family members, the kinds of people many would never guess have a mental illness. 

However unlike Dale, only 45 per cent of people with a mental health problem seek professional help, according to the Australian Psychological Society. 

Chris Bogusis too knows what it’s like to live with the stigma and self-stigma that often accompanies diagnoses like Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. 

To mark Mental Health Week, Dale and Chris have shared stories of their everyday lives on the Border.

The Border Mail

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